Parish Councillor Vacancy – Longworth Parish Council

Please contact Gill Carlisle, Parish Clerk on longworthpc@mail.com for more information

Raising the bar in recycling: Your chance to talk rubbish and recycling with Oxfordshire’s councils

Do you know that each household in Oxfordshire produces one tonne of waste each year? We are amongst the best in the country at recycling and composting for a few years now at about 60% but recycling rates have started to drop in Oxfordshire.

Residents are being given the chance to talk rubbish and recycling and tell Oxfordshire’s county, city and district councils how they can help them recycle more and create less waste.

This consultation will inform the review of the joint countywide waste strategy. This sets out shared priorities across Oxfordshire for waste and recycling until 2030, that will be approved by the Oxfordshire Environment Partnership over the summer. Then, each council partner will adopt changes later in the year.

We want to do better at recycling and the new joint countywide waste strategy is critical to this. We know that on average over half of the items put in the general waste bin could have been recycled by placing them in the other bins available.

Through this consultation residents are being asked what would help them to reduce their overall waste consumption and recycle more. This includes expanding the range of materials that can be recycled at the kerbside and tips and advice on left-over food, upcycling clothing or donating or buying second hand goods. The councils are also seeking views on more radical schemes that have been implemented elsewhere in the country, such as changing bin sizes and collection frequency.

Councillor Yvonne Constance, Cabinet Member for Environment at Oxfordshire County Council said: “We want to help residents to increase the amount they recycle and have looked around at what other councils are doing. This is a long-term strategy and we will not be making any immediate changes however we are interested in which of these the residents of Oxfordshire think may work for them as we seek to minimise the overall amount of residual waste produced in the county.”

Do you want to help us recycle and reduce waste? Take part in the online survey atwww.recycleforoxfordshire.org.ukThe survey runs for six weeks until 18 February.

We want to ensure that as many residents as possible know about the changes.  If your parish council uses social media we would also be grateful if you could like and share our social media posts, and post the following information and graphic attached:

 

  • Your councils want your ideas about reducing, reusing and recycling our rubbish. Help them shape the future of waste and recycling services in Oxfordshire and tell them how they can help you recycle more – complete their survey by 18 February www.recycleforoxfordshire.org.uk

 

If you have any questions please let me know
Kind regards
Rachel Burns MCIWM
Waste Strategy Officer
( working days are Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday)
Oxfordshire County Council, County Hall, New Road, Oxford, OX1 1ND
Waste Management Group: 01865 816043
Mobile: 07789 877310
Fax: 01865 713930

The Water Gypsy

Just over 250 years ago a real-life Cinderella story played out in the villages along our very own Golden Ridge when the daughter of a local fishing family married a viscount.

The Ridge family was all over this area like a rash; parish registers all along the river Thames from Buckland through Longworth and Northmoor to Appleton, Cumnor and beyond show hundreds of Ridges. But one branch of the family got lucky. Eighteen-year-old Betty Ridge (the clue’s in the name) was serving in her father’s riverside inn at Northmoor when in 1763 she met William Flower, 2nd Viscount Ashbrook, who was on a day out from his college at Christ Church. William fell madly in love with the beautiful Betty and, against his guardians’ wishes, he married Betty in 1766.

So far, so extraordinary. But what happened next was even more astonishing. Do come along to hear the full story courtesy of the Longworth and District History Society at Southmoor Village Hall on Thursday 18th January 2018 at 7.30pm, when local historian Julie Ann Godson brings the story home to the Golden Ridge in a talk entitled “The Water Gypsy: how a Thames fishergirl became a viscountess”. Julie Ann will be signing copies of her book of the same name at the discounted price of £10 (£11.49 on Amazon.co.uk). For further details, contact kathyfletcher540@gmail.com.

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New Councillor needed for Longworth Parish Council

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Waste and recycling collection w/c 11/12/17

Monday 11 December

Some of today’s waste and recycling collections are being affected by adverse weather conditions. Please see below a message that we are sharing with residents. We will be keeping both the South and Vale websites updated, along with social media.

Your waste collections – adverse weather conditions

Our waste collection crews are out and about emptying bins where they can, although most side streets are too dangerous for their 26 tonne trucks.

If it is safe to do so, please put your bins out as normal. If the bins in your street aren’t emptied on your normal collection day, please leave them out for three days and we will try and come back to get them. If we haven’t managed to get back to you in three days, bring your bins back in and we will come and get them next time they’re due. If this is the case, we will collect extra waste left out next to your bin next time around.

Even if the roads around you are clear, it might still be difficult for our waste collection crews to reach you – that might be because the roads between you and our depot are not passable for our large trucks or it might just be that the snow and ice has slowed the crew down so much that they aren’t able to finish their complete rounds in on

LHS – Salter’s Steamers

LHS 16-Nov-17

“Asian Hornets” in Longworth Village? Be Careful

Insect thought to be “Asian Hornets” have been found in the village , and someone has been stung.

What do you need to know?

The Great British Non-native Species Website, affiliated with Defra, has issued a ‘species alert’.

It said: “Vespa velutina, also known as the Asian hornet is an invasive non-native species from Asia. It arrived in France in 2004 where it spread rapidly. As a highly effective predator of insects, including honey bees and other beneficial species, it can cause significant losses to bee colonies, and potentially other native species.

“The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of the Asian hornet in the Tetbury area of Gloucestershire in September 2016 – the first time the hornet has been discovered in the UK.

“The places it is most likely to be found are in southern parts of England or goods among which it could be accidentally imported (such as soil with imported pot plants, cut flowers, fruit and timber).

“Active months between April and November (peak August/September). Inactive over the winter.”
Please be careful, if you come across these, make a note of where they are and let me know
Gill Carlisle
Parish Clerk – Longworth Parish Council

South and Vale media release – ‘Don’t bin your batteries’ call following waste and recycling truck fires

 

Released on October 25, 2017

Residents in South Oxfordshire and the Vale of White Horse have been urged not to put batteries or other items which could cause a fire in their waste or recycling wheelie bin.

Last week two small fires started in rubbish while it was being transported in waste and recycling trucks.  Both were potentially very dangerous incidents to the crews, other road users and pedestrians.  They also caused delays to collections and could have resulted in significant damage.

The first incident took place while a waste truck was travelling on the A417 in Wantage.  The crew were escorted to a layby by two fire engines where they emptied part of the load so the fire service could extinguish the fire.

The second fire was detected in a recycling load collected in Radley. The fire service attended as crews tipped the load at Biffa’s depot in Culham.  A gas canister was found in the load meaning that, had the fire spread, it could have exploded causing significant damage or injury.

The fires were caused by items residents had put in their bins, most likely to have been standard lithium-ion batteries – like the ones found in most mobile phones.

Batteries should be put in a clear plastic bag and left on top of the green recycling bin, while small electrical items, that may also contain batteries, can be put out in a carrier bag alongside the grey refuse bin for separate collection.

Cllr Tony Harbour, Cabinet Member for Waste and Recycling at South Oxfordshire District Council, said: “If an item in a waste truck or at the deport catches fire then it could be extremely dangerous.  I urge all of our residents to check that they are not putting items in their bins which could cause a fire.”

Cllr Charlotte Dickson, Cabinet Member for Waste and Recycling at Vale of White Horse District Council, said: “If you need to throw out electrical equipment or batteries don’t put them in either of your wheelie bins.  Please check on our websites or give Biffa a call on 03000 610610 if you are unsure what to do.”

 

 

Communications
South Oxfordshire and Vale of White Horse District Councils
01235 422400

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Service of Consecration

Beer, Sausages, Marmalade, Food, Drink, Politics in 19th C Oxford

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